Feb
18

A-B-C with the MTA

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Where: The passageway from the 4/5/6 at Grand Central Terminal to the 42nd St. Shuttle.
What: A misspelling of Madison Ave. captured via iPhone by SAS reader Nick M.

It’s been a rough week for the MTA’s signs and its general overall spelling ability. Last week, New York City Transit came under fire for a 70-year-old typo at Broadway along the IND Crosstown line. Since then, savvy straphangers have noticed misspellings everywhere. My favorite is the one about Queeens. Such are the ways of the Internet.

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fultonocculus

With federal stimulus funding in place, the Fulton St. oculus may be saved.

Now that the United States Congress has approved the controversial stimulus plan, New Yorkers can start counting their delays. Over the next few weeks and months, the MTA, among other agencies, will receive an infusion of cash and will thus be able to complete or accelerate numerous capital projects. Sadly, though, $1.3 billion just doesn’t go as far as it once did.

According to a Daily News profile of the New York-based movers and shakers behind the stimulus package, the city’s beleaguered transit agency will receive approximately that amount. The total could go up or down by a few hundred million based upon the formulas, but in the end, it should fall short of the anticipated $1.5 billion upon which we were counting two weeks ago.

Meanwhile, here in New York, the MTA has yet to release a list of official stimulus projects. However, we can take a peak at an early version of the list — beginning on page 11 of that PDF file — to get a sense of what may earn funding.

As of now, I believe that the MTA will look to see if they can revive the lost 7 line stop at 41st and Tenth Ave. That’s a $400-$500 million project though. The agency may also siphon a good amount of money — up to another $500 million — into the Fulton St. hub. If the spend the bulk of their money on those two projects though, the remaining $300 million seems rather meager.

Meanwhile, the proposed projects are necessary but decidedly less sexy. Basically, the MTA has to use this money to fund a series of shovel-ready projects that could actually provide jobs and kickstart the economy as this recovery package is intended to do. New York City Transit may look to replace a series of flood-prone vents along Jackson Ave. in Queens while overhauling 10 stations along the West End line in Brooklyn. Forty-three stations could receive their long-awaited public address systems, and the IRT platforms at Union Sq. may receive some new gap-fillers.

Beyond that, some Metro-North and LIRR projects are on tap for federal funds, and the East Side Access plan could use the cash as well. If that sounds like a lot of projects competing for not very much money, well, that’s because it is.

In the end, the stimulus money is simply a small infusion of capital cash. It’s not designed to fund transit as much as it is designed to get projects moving with the hopes that more money will be invested into them later on. The MTA needs it, but the agency will soon be asking for $30 billion over five years. Where that money will come from is anyone’s guess.

Categories : MTA Economics
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Nearly seven and a half years later, the various Ground Zero projects are starting to come together. This weekend, the Daily News explored a transit-related aspect of the massive redevelopment program: the East-West Connector that will run from Fulton St. and the new Port Authority PATH terminal to the Winter Garden and Battery Park City. Douglas Feiden captured some film, above, of the project and reports that it is due to open in 2013 or 2014.

Categories : PANYNJ
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Dearly beloved, we are gathered here today out of sadness for again we are burying part of a New York City subway line. As more and more people speak out against a payroll tax to save the MTA, the service cuts and fare hikes draw ever closer.

Today, at 10:30 a.m. at the Court Square subway station on the IND Crosstown line, we bury the G train’s northern extension. No longer with the misbegotten stepchild of the subway system reach from Carroll Gardens to Forest Hills. Instead, the G will permanently terminate at Court Square, doomed to leave Brooklyn-to-Queens riders searching for a transfer, another train and a faster way to travel between the city’s largest and most populous boroughs.

This is, of course, not the first time we have eulogized a train line facing its final few weeks of existence. In mid-January, we remembered the Z while we blamed this financial crisis in part on the grandstanding politicians who showed up for the Nassau Street Express’ final rites.

Two weeks ago, those same politicians buried the M and R trains in Manhattan and Brooklyn at least. The M will no longer head south of Broad St. during rush hour, and a few stations along the BMT Broadway line in Lower Manhattan will no longer enjoy late-night service. Prior to that, The Observer noted that no one will really miss the W, the city’s least reliable and dirtiest subway line. But we can’t neglect the Black Sheep of the family.

Meanwhile, the G train funeral offers much of the same. Joining the Straphangers Campaign at Court Sq. later today will be Joseph Lentol and Hakeem Jeffries, two state assembly representatives. Both of these representatives have something in common: They opposed a plan last year that would have delivered more service to the G line. Public hypocrisy, it seems, knows no bounds.

For Jeffries, this is nothing new. With an assist from Streetsblog, we took him to task last May for bemoaning the state of the G train after helping shoot down the congestion pricing plan. Lentol, meanwhile, was more guarded in his views but never really warmed to Mayor Bloomberg’s plan.

Today, these two officials are going to do what politicians do best. They are going to pander to their constituents less than a year after voting down a plan that would have accomplished just what they want to see happen today. Nothing beats a politician at a photo op. I just hope voters remember in November who killed their subway lines.

Categories : Service Cuts
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  • Under Atlantic Avenue · The oldest subway in New York City isn’t a pneumatic subway once buried under Broadway and now probably lost to time. Rather, it is a tunnel from the 1800s under Atlantic Ave. in Brooklyn. This original LIRR tunnel dates from the 1840s and has been closed since the Civil War. In 1980, Bob Diamond rediscovered the tunnel and has conducted tours of it. He now believes that he is close to uncovering a 150-year-old locomotive behind a wall near Hicks St. This weekend, The Times City Section delved into the tale of the tunnel, and the story is a must-read for any New York train buff. Check out the slideshow too. · (0)

The last few weekends have been heavy on the service announcements. With the holidays behind us, the MTA has been stepping up the weekend work as it continues the seemingly endless Capital Rebuilding Program. Often, these weekend service changes lead to some very odd results.

Take, for example, the changes from two weeks ago. That weekend, service to Lower Manhattan resembled what it will be if the service cuts come to be: The stations along the Broadway line were shuttered as the N and R were running over the Manhattan Bridge.

At the Q stop at Seventh Ave. in Brooklyn, the station announcements were warning passengers of the changes. The instructions though were rather odd. To provide service to Lower Manhattan, went the announcement, passengers were encouraged to take the Q to DeKalb Ave., exit the system and board the 4 train a few blocks away at Nevins St. The walk is about 0.1 miles according to Google Maps and should take all of two minutes.

Now, that seems reasonable, right? The 4, after all, stops near enough to Whitehall St., Rector St. and City Hall to mirror the N and R. Well, of course, but take another look at the MTA’s directions. The authority was urging people to exit the system at DeKalb and reenter at Nevins St. when one stop earlier — at Atlantic Ave. — straphangers can take advantage of a free, in-system transfer between the Q and the 4.

I certainly understand that the MTA is facing a budget crisis of epic proportions, and I’d love to see them get out of this without cutting service or drastically raising fares. But it seems rather disingenuous to urge riders to transfer out of the system for a second fare when a free transfer between the train lines in question is in place just one stop down the line. That’s just not right.

Categories : MTA Absurdity
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A D train derailed near the 81st St./Museum of Natural History stop at 12:35 p.m. this afternoon. Two cars skipped a rail on the Coney Island-bound tracks. While no one was injured, riders should expect delays along both the 8th Ave. and 6th Ave. lines. Keep an eye out on the MTA service alerts for up-to-the-minute info about the delays.

* * *

Speaking of things going offline, expect some downtime for Second Ave. Sagas this weekend. My web host is switching this site from one server to the other, and it may take a few hours for the DNS updates to make their ways across the Internet. It’s a three-day weekend though, and everything will be back online well before the end of the weekend.

* * *

Don’t forget to check out the trailer for the remaking of The Taking of Pelham 123. And remember: Trains are running on a Saturday schedule on Monday.


From 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, February 14 and Sunday, February 15, Manhattan-bound 1 trains skip 238th, 231st, and 225th Streets due to replacement of defective rail plates.


From 12:01 a.m. Saturday, February 14 to 5 a.m. Monday, February 16, uptown 1 and 2 trains skip 79th, 86th, and 96th Streets due to work on tunnel lighting and station rehabilitation at 96th Street.


From 12:01 a.m. Saturday, February 14 to 5 a.m. Tuesday, February 17, 2 trains run in two sections (due to switch renewal at Nostrand Avenue):

  • Between 241st Street and Franklin Avenue and
  • Between Franklin and Flatbush Avenues


From 11:30 p.m. Friday, February 13 to 5 a.m. Tuesday, February 17, free shuttle buses replace 3 trains between Franklin and Utica Avenues due to switch renewal at Nostrand Avenue.


From 12:01 a.m. Saturday, February 14 to 5 a.m. Monday, February 16, uptown 3 trains skip 96th Street due to station rehabilitation at 96th Street.


From 12:01 a.m. Saturday, February 14 to 5 a.m. Tuesday, February 17, shuttle trains run between Utica and New Lots Avenues due to switch renewal at Nostrand Avenue.


From 11:30 p.m. Friday, February 13 to 5 a.m. Tuesday, February 17, there is no 4 train service between Atlantic and Utica Avenues due to switch renewal at Nostrand Avenue. The 23 and shuttle buses provide alternative service.


From 12:01 a.m. Saturday, February 14 to 5 a.m. Monday, February 16, there is no 5 train service between Bowling Green and East 180th Street due to track panel installation north of Gun Hill Road and cable tray installation north of East 180th Street. Customers may take the 2 or 4 instead. 5 trains run every 30 minutes between Dyre Avenue and East 180th Street.


From 11:30 p.m. Friday, February 13 to 5 a.m. Tuesday, February 17 (and weekends through Feb 27-Mar 2), there are no 7 trains between Times Square-42nd Street and Queensboro Plaza due to track panel installation on the Davis Street curve and security conduit and cable installation in the under river tube. The NQ and free shuttle buses provide alternate service. The 42nd Street Shuttle S operates overnight to replace 7 service between Times Square-42nd Street and Grand Central-42nd Street.


From 11:30 p.m. Friday, February 13 to 5 a.m. Tuesday, February 17, free shuttle buses replace A trains between 168th Street and 207th Street due to tunnel and lighting work. Customers may transfer between the Broadway or Ft. Washington Avenue shuttle buses and the A train at 168th Street.


From 10:30 p.m. Friday, February 13 to 5 a.m. Tuesday, February 17, free shuttle buses replace A trains between Beach 90th Street and Far Rockaway due to track panel work.


From 12:01 a.m. Saturday, February 14 to 5 a.m. Tuesday, February 17, Manhattan-bound A trains run local from Euclid Avenue to Canal Street, then express to 59th Street, then local to 168th Street. Queens-bound A trains run local from 168th to 125th Streets, then express to 59th Street, then local to Euclid Avenue. These changes are due to signal work at Chambers Street and a track chip-out north of 116th Street.


From 12:01 a.m. Saturday, February 14 to 5 a.m. Tuesday, February 17, there are no C trains running due to roadbed replacement work at 116th Street and signal work at Chambers Street. Customers should take the A instead.


From 12:01 a.m. Saturday, February 14 to 5 a.m. Monday, February 16, there are no D trains between Pacific Street and 34th Street due to security conduit and cable installation. The N train and free shuttle buses provide alternate service.


From 12:01 a.m. Saturday, February 14 to 5 a.m. Monday, February 16, D trains run express between 36th Street and Pacific Street due to security conduit and cable installation.


From 12:01 a.m. Saturday, February 14 to 5 a.m. Monday, February 16 (and weekends through February 21-23), there is no E train service between West 4th Street and World Trade Center due to signal work at Chambers Street.


From 12:01 a.m. to noon Saturday, February 14, Jamaica-bound F trains skip Van Wyck and Sutphin Blvds. due to installation of track drains.


From 8:30 p.m. Friday, February 13 to 5 a.m. Monday, February 16 (until further notice), there are no G trains between Forest Hills-71st Avenue and Court Square due to third rail work. Customers should take the E or R instead.


From 3:30 a.m. Saturday, February 14 to 10 p.m. Sunday, February 15, there are no J trains between Broadway Junction and Jamaica Center-Parsons/Archer due to fiber optic cable installation. Free shuttle buses replace trains between Broadway Junction and the Jamaica Van Wyck E station.


From 11:30 p.m. Friday, February, 13 to 5 a.m. Monday, February 16, there are no L trains between 8th Avenue and Union Square due to installation of emergency lighting. Customers should use the M14 or shuttle bus instead.


From 11:30 p.m. Friday, February 13 to 5 a.m. Monday, February 16, L trains run in two sections (due to installation of emergency lighting):

  • Between Union Square and Bedford Avenue every 16 minutes*, skipping 3rd Avenue and
  • Between Bedford Avenue and Rockaway Parkway every 8 minutes*

Customers must transfer at Bedford Avenue to continue their trip.
*10 p.m. Sunday, February 15 to 5 a.m. Monday, trains run every 20 minutes.


From 12:01 a.m. Saturday, February 14 to 5 a.m. Monday, February 16, Manhattan-bound NR trains are rerouted over the Manhattan Bridge from DeKalb Avenue to Canal Street due to subway tunnel rehabilitation.


From 12:01 a.m. Saturday, February 14 to 5 a.m. Monday, February 16, Q trains are extended to Ditmars Boulevard N station due to track panel installation on the Davis Street curve and security conduit and cable installation in the under river tube.


From 11:30 p.m. Friday, February 13 to 5 a.m. Monday, February 16, the 42nd Street Shuttle S operates overnight to replace 7 service between Times Square-42nd Street and Grand Central-42nd Street due to track panel installation on the Davis Street curve and security conduit and cable installation in the under river tube.

Categories : Service Advisories
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I’ve been waiting for this one for a while…

Categories : Subway Movies
Comments (10)

Things are not looking good for the MTA. With just 40 days left until the MTA Board is set to vote on a draconian package of service cuts and a fare hike, the prospects for a Richard Ravitch-inspired bailout are growing dimmer and dimmer.

The problems crept up on Monday when I noted how Westchester and Long Island pols were not embracing a 0.33 percent payroll tax. Today, the news gets worse. As William Neuman writes in The Times, no one is too thrilled with any of the possibilities. He writes:

When Richard Ravitch revealed his financial rescue plan for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority in December, the harshest criticism focused on a proposal to place tolls on the East River and Harlem River Bridges.

That made the plan’s centerpiece, a proposed new tax on payrolls in the 12 counties served by the authority, seem painless by comparison.

But since then, resistance to the payroll tax, which would raise $1.5 billion a year, has been building, especially in areas farther from New York City with less access to mass transit.

And opposition is coming not just from businesses that would pay the tax but also from public officials worried about schools and health care. That is because the tax envisioned by Mr. Ravitch, 33 cents on every $100 in salaries and wages, would apply equally to private businesses, nonprofit organizations and government agencies, including school districts.

The quotes from public officials are what you would expect. “Opposed, opposed, opposed, opposed, absolutely,” Orange County rep Aileen Gunther said to Neuman. “It” — meaning the tax — “is going to be devastating.”

“The thing that irks us is we’re really paying for somebody else’s problem,” Ken Eastwood, an Orange County school superintendent, said. “It’d be nice if we could turn around and say to the M.T.A., ‘We’d like to tax each of your riders X amount of dollars for our school district.’ They’d freak out.”

The flip side to this, of course, is that the economy will suffer a far more drastic downturn without this tax than with it. Transit will become a problem rather than a integral part of a commute. The region — known for relatively speedy access from suburbs to the economic hub of New York City — will suffer. Property values will go down; wages will go down; productivity will go down. Those schools will lose a lot more as people’s tax burden drops than they will under the Ravitch plan.

It all sounds very doom-and-gloom, but that’s reality. Still, no one in the government is putting it that way. Gov. David Paterson keeps talking about an upcoming push to support the plan, and I hope that enough New York City representatives can garner the support needed to pass it. We can’t afford not to bail out the MTA, and no one knows that more than Richard Ravitch himself.

“Nobody likes taxes, nobody likes tolls, nobody likes fare increases, nobody likes service cuts,” he said to Neuman, “and everybody should be terrified by the idea of the system not continuing to be in a state of good repair and starting back on a slippery slope.”

Categories : Ravitch Commission
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