The WTC PATH Train Hub is nestled amidst the hustle and bustle of Lower Manhattan. (Photo by Benjamin Kabak)

The WTC PATH Train Hub is nestled amidst the hustle and bustle of Lower Manhattan. (Photo by Benjamin Kabak)

At the risk of, as I put last night, tilting at windmills, I’d like to re-revisit the PATH Hub, and David W. Dunlap’s Times article on the many ways in which this project has gone wrong. In yesterday’s post, I framed it again, as I’ve done many times, as a project plagued by a starchitect’s ego. In my view, he ran rough-shod over a sloppy political process, and an agency beset with leadership problems. That’s not far incorrect, but it’s not the issue facing the World Trade Center PATH Hub.

The rust I focused on last night probably isn’t rust; the fireproofing wasn’t necessarily the fault of the person who sketched out a vision too grand for a subway stop. In the end, I’ve likely been too hard on Calatrava, if that’s possible, while giving the political drivers a pass. So let’s look again at some gems from Dunlap’s article.

We start with George Pataki. He was actually the governor when this crazy saga began. That’s how long it’s taken to build this thing!

George E. Pataki, a Republican who was then the governor of New York, was considering a run for president and knew his reputation would be burnished by a train terminal he said would claim a “rightful place among New York City’s most inspiring architectural icons.” He likened the transportation hub to Grand Central and promised — unrealistically — that it would be operating in 2009.

But the governor fully supported the Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s desire to keep the newly rebuilt No. 1 subway line running through the trade center site, instead of allowing the Port Authority to temporarily close part of the line and shave months and hundreds of millions of dollars off the hub’s construction. That, however, would have cut an important transit link and angered commuters from Staten Island, a Republican stronghold, who use the No. 1 line after getting off the ferry. The authority was forced to build under, around and over the subway line, at a cost of at least $355 million.

It’s unclear as well how much additional time building around over the subway line took, but I sometimes wonder if that argument is a spurious one. Considering how long it’s taken to build, there’s no way anyone could have survived politically with 1 train service to South Ferry out of commission for so long.

How about Bloomberg?

Michael R. Bloomberg, who was then the mayor, demanded in 2008 that the memorial be completed by the attack’s 10-year anniversary. That meant part of the hub’s roof, which would be the decking under the memorial plaza, had to be built first, adding about $75 million to the budget.

And how about the Port Authority?

A 2005 construction contract was supposed to set a guaranteed maximum price, but to accelerate the work, several expensive subcontracts were approved. And in 2008, the authority rejected money-saving suggestions worth over $500 million.

And the security state from the post-9/11 mindset so pervasive in the early 2000s?

And there were many hitches. The Bloomberg administration upended the project in 2005, when a Police Department security assessment compelled significant revisions. To improve blast resistance, the Oculus had to have twice the number of steel ribs. The birdlike structure began to resemble a stegosaurus.

And that pesky problem of leadership churn that has rendered the Port Authority impotent and ineffective for the better part of a decade?

Consistent direction was rendered almost impossible by constantly changing leadership: four New York governors who appointed five executive directors of the authority, and five New Jersey governors who appointed four chairmen. Complicating matters even more, different projects were undertaken within inches of one another at ground zero. For a time, a plastic tarp was all that separated the hub from the National September 11 Memorial Museum. Contributing to the bloat in the budget was the authority’s practice of using it as a catchall for any related work performed on abutting sites, on common passageways and on shared mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems — over $400 million in all…

The authority did move to trim costs in 2008 by reducing the size of the Oculus and eliminating the movable roof. Still, it rebuffed suggestions from independent engineers and architects that the Oculus be even smaller, that parts of the temporary station be reused and that columns, rather than a bridgelike structure, carry the No. 1 subway line through the hub’s interior.

There’s more in Dunlap’s story, and if you didn’t read it last night, read it tonight. In a way, Santiago Calatrava is a red herring, though Dunlap’s story traces how his demands too helped contribute to the problem. This is about the faulty political process and the politicalization of the Port Authority, and again, I ask if we’ve learned anything. When the Hub opens, Shiny New Toy Syndrome will push the cost problem into the background, and we’ll forget how, even at $2 billion, this thing was overpriced. What comes next?

Categories : PANYNJ
Comments (46)
Santiago Calatrava's PATH Hub soars through the Lower Manhattan sky. (Photo by Benjamin Kabak)

Santiago Calatrava’s PATH Hub soars through the Lower Manhattan sky. (Photo by Benjamin Kabak)

While in Lower Manhattan for the opening of the Fulton St. Transit Center in early November, I had a few minutes to wander around the much-transformed area. As I strolled over to the World Trade Center site, I couldn’t help but notice Santiago Calatrava’s PATH Hub. It looms above the area, piercing the sky in a rather impressive way. If you don’t know anything about the price tag or tortured history of the project, you would be right to marvel at this structure. But there’s something odd about it: Not even open to the public yet, its visible joints are already rusting.

In the various renderings of the $4 billion structure, the joints were neither visible nor rusting, and I wondered if this were part of the plan or not. And then, out come David W. Dunlap’s in-depth look at the PATH Hub with this gem at the end:

What did nearly $4 billion buy? Certainly an arresting structure, but one whose details do not match the shimmering images that Mr. Calatrava used to seduce officials a decade ago.

For instance, the ribs of the mezzanine looked sleek as silk in the renderings but in reality have the texture of stucco because of a fire-protective coating. Asked in March why no one had smoothed the surfaces, Mr. Calatrava’s office answered, “The client was not prepared to spend the additional money.”

That’s right: After falling to meet his already-lofty budget by nearly 100 percent, Calatrava tried to milk more money out of the Port Authority. If that’s not symbolic of the entire project, I don’t know what is.

This anecdote aside, Dunlap’s profile of this project is well worth the read. He delves into the spurious numbers that supported a big expense on a subway station and tracks the lack of leadership at the Port Authority as no one was in a position to stop project costs from spiraling out of control. Somehow, the PA expects 160,000 PATH riders per day, a jump of four times the current daily ridership, and it’s not clear how or where this number originates as the $3.7 billion station included no money for additional service. Here’s a key excerpt:

The price tag is approaching $4 billion, almost twice the estimate when plans were unveiled in 2004. Administrative costs alone — construction management, supervision, inspection, monitoring and documentation, among other items — exceed $655 million. Even the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which is developing and building the hub, conceded that it would have made other choices had it known 10 years ago what it knows now. “We would not today prioritize spending $3.7 billion on the transit hub over other significant infrastructure needs,” Patrick J. Foye, the authority’s executive director, said in October.

The current, temporary trade center station serves an average of 46,000 commuters riding PATH trains to and from New Jersey every weekday, only 10,000 more than use the unassuming 33rd Street PATH terminal in Midtown Manhattan. By contrast, 208,000 Metro-North Railroad commuters stream through Grand Central Terminal daily. In fact, the hub, or at least its winged “Oculus” pavilion, could turn out to be more of a high-priced mall than a transportation nexus, attracting more shoppers than commuters…

But whatever its ultimate renown, the hub has been a money-chewing project plagued by problems far beyond an exotic and expensive design by its exacting architect, Santiago Calatrava, according to an examination based on two dozen interviews and a review of hundreds of pages of documents. The soaring price tag has also been fueled by the demands of powerful politicians whose priorities outweighed worries about the bottom line, as well as the Port Authority’s questionable management and oversight of private contractors.

Read through the whole piece as Dunlap finds fault with then-Gov. George Pataki’s plans, then-Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s meddling and the Port Authority’s inability to lead. It’s a sobering look at a flawed project.

At this point, I’ve written extensively about the wasteful spending we’ve seen in the PATH Hub, and I’m almost tilting at windmills. It’s likely that the mall will offset some of the costs, but it’s clear maintenance expenditures will be far higher than they should be. As the Port Authority gears up to invest a lot of money into our region’s airports, we can wonder how we could have better used these dollars, but the key is to learn from this mistake. If we can’t, we’ll be doomed to repeat it — at Moynihan Station perhaps or elsewhere — and that’s something the region, with its myriad transportation needs, simply cannot afford.

Categories : PANYNJ
Comments (72)

I checked the calendar this morning, and it is indeed December. I also attempted to go outside in areas usually reserved for tourists and found it to be December there as well. Thus, with an influx of visitors and the holidays upon us, Transit has slowed the pace of weekend work. As you’ll see from this week’s advisories, not much is happening. Thanks for sticking around this week. I didn’t have much time for anything.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, December 5 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, December 8, Brooklyn Bridge-bound 6 trains run express from Hunters Point Av to 3Av-138 St.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, December 5 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, December 8, Brooklyn-bound A trains skip 111 St. For service to this station use the Q112 bus, or take a Brooklyn-bound A train to Rockaway Blvd and transfer to a Lefferts Blvd-bound A. For service from this station, take a Lefferts Blvd-bound A train to Lefferts Blvd, transfer to a Brooklyn-bound A.


From 10:45 p.m. Friday, December 5 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, December 8, Norwood-205 St bound D trains run express from 145 St to Tremont Av.


From 12:15 a.m. Saturday, December 6 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, December 8, Jamaica Center-bound E trains run express from Queens Plaza to Roosevelt Av.


From 5:30 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Saturday, December 6 and Sunday, December 7, G trains run every 20 minutes between Long Island City-Court Sq and Bedford-Nostrand Avs. The last stop for some G trains headed toward Court Sq is Bedford-Nostrand Avs. To continue your trip, transfer at Bedford-Nostrand Avs to Court Sq-bound G train.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, December 5 to 6:30 a.m. Sunday, December 7, and from 11:45 p.m. Sunday, December 7 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, December 8, N trains are rerouted via the Q line in both directions between Canal St and DeKalb Av.


From 10:45 p.m. Friday, December 5 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, December 8, 57 St-7 Av bound Q trains run express from Kings Hwy to Prospect Park.


From 6:00 a.m. to 12 Midnight, Saturday, December 7, and Sunday, December 8, R trains are rerouted via the Q line in both directions between Canal St and DeKalb Av.

(Franklin Ave.)
From 12:01 a.m. Saturday, December 6 to 9:00 p.m. Sunday, December 7, Franklin Av Shuttle trains run every 24 minutes.

Categories : Service Advisories
Comments (3)

If this foul-mouthed can figure this out, the rest of us should too, and it’s far better than being told, as we once were, that courtesy is contagious. I particularly enjoyed the puppets’ “Showtime!” routine at around the 45-second mark.

I’ll have more substantial material over the weekend. As a preview, check out David W. Dunlap’s excellent exploration of everyone’s favorite $4 billion subway station. There’s a lot to unpack in that piece, including a kicker that seems to indicate Santiago Calatrava tried to go back to the Port Authority for even more money when his designs fell short of expectations. As you can imagine, I have lots of thoughts on that piece, and I’ll share them soon.

Comments (7)

When it comes to proper subway behavior, I have Very Strong Opinions about things. I’m not a big fan of the “Showtime!” troupes who sweep folks out of the way on crowded subways to perform acrobatic feats that are often more feet than anything else (though I did see a good pole routine on a semi-empty train a few weeks back). I also believe that healthy adults with backpacks should them respectfully at their feet, and riders should generally take up the right amount of space without doing anything too disgusting or personal in public.

So when I heard about a wedding on an N train on Friday, I raised a quizzical eyebrow. Maybe it’s because I’m amidst planning my own wedding (or at least my fiancée is), but I find myself unable to grow too skeptical of a wedding. And as far as minimizing impact to other riders, this one was perfect. The bridge and groom were married on a Manhattan-bound N train at 3:30 p.m. on Friday afternoon of Thanksgiving Day weekend. The bride boarded the train at 36th St., and they performed the ceremony while crossing the Manhattan Bridge. That’s a low-traffic time on a low-traffic route.

The groom summed up this zany idea. “We’ve been through a lot. Good times, bad times, and a lot of the good times have taken place on the train,” Hector Irakliotis said. “Confessions of love, reconciliations, goofy, ridiculous conversations — the whole spectrum. In New York, you spend so much time on the train, we thought why not?”

As Gawker noted, it’s exceedingly easy to answer Irakliotis’ rhetorical question, but the bride’s reason is enough to melt anyone’s heart. “I’m originally from Ukraine, and each time we’d come back here, I’d say to Hector, ‘It doesn’t feel like home until I see the skyline as we’re crossing the bridge.’ And he remembered that. He planned it out specifically so that we’d see the skyline as we were married,” Tatyana Sandler said. Hopefully, we won’t be flooded with copy cats, but as many of my Twitter followers noted, a beaming bridge is far more preferable to a flying foot landing on a straphanger’s nose.

I’m traveling for business this week and will check in when I can. I don’t anticipate any breaking news but, with the subways, you never know.

Comments (26)

That yesterday was Friday sort of slipped my mind, but these are still in place all weekend. Hope you had a good Turkey Day.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, November 28 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, December 1, Van Cortlandt-242 St bound 1 trains run express from Chambers St to 34 St-Penn Station.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, November 28 to 6:30 a.m. Sunday, November 30, and from 11:45 p.m. Sunday, November 30 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, December 1, Van Cortlandt-242 St bound 2 trains run express from Chambers St to 34 St-Penn Station.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, November 28 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, December 1, 3 service operates to/from New Lots Av all weekend, replacing the 4 in Brooklyn. 3 trains run express in Manhattan all weekend.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, November 28 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, December 1, 4 trains are suspended in both directions between Brooklyn Bridge-City Hall and New Lots Av. Take 23NQR trains instead. For service between Manhattan and Brooklyn, take the NQR between 14 St-Union Sq or Canal St and Atlantic Av-Barclays Ctr. Transfer between the 4 or 6 and N, Q or R at 14 St-Union Sq or Canal St. 4 service operates local between Woodlawn and Brooklyn Bridge-City Hall all weekend.


From 6:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Saturday, November 29, and from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Sunday, November 30, 5 trains are suspended in both directions between Grand Central-42 St and Bowling Green. Take 4, 5, 6 or R trains instead. Trains run every 20 minutes between Eastchester-Dyre Av and Grand Central-42 St.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, November 28 to 4:00 a.m. Monday, December 1, Pelham Bay Park-bound 6 trains run express from Parkchester to Pelham Bay Park.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, November 28 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, December 1, Brooklyn Bridge-bound 6 trains run express from Hunters Point Av to 3Av-138 St.


From 7:30 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Saturday, November 29 and from 11:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Sunday, November 30, 6 trains run every 16 minutes between 3 Av-138 St and Pelham Bay Park. The last stop for some 6 trains headed toward Pelham Bay Park is 3 Av-138 St. To continue your trip, transfer at 3 Av-138 St to a Pelham Bay Park-bound 6 train.


From 10:45 p.m. Friday, November 28 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, December 1, Norwood-205 St bound D trains run express from 145 St to Tremont Av.


From 5:45 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Saturday, November 29, Chambers St-bound J trains run express from Broadway Junction to Myrtle Av.

Categories : Service Advisories
Comments (6)

Screen Shot 2014-11-26 at 12.02.11 AM

A fundamental question that isn’t often considered about New York City’s transit network concerns the adequacy of current service. Is a transit network that is essentially the same as it was in 1970 sufficient for New York City in 2014? Even if we flip ahead to 2020 when the 7 line extension, presumably, will be open, and the first phase of the Second Ave. Subway, presumably, will be open, not all that much will have changed over the past 50 years. Other than the advent of the MetroCard, improvements have been around the margins.

Very few things that are so integral to our everyday lives last five decades without change. Now, we can’t overlook new rolling stock and around $70 billion of investment in the region’s transit network, but we also can’t grow complacent. Complacency — or outright complaint — has led to where we are now. The MTA is reviled, and worse, the MTA’s forward progress seems to involve hauling a two-ton rock up a steep hill.

Nothing proves this point quite like the MTA’s Reinvention Commission report. I spoke earlier this week on my disappointment with the commission, and on Tuesday — two days before Thanksgiving — at 5:30 p.m. in a blatantly obvious attempt to bury a much-anticipated report that wound up saying very little, the MTA released the final draft. From the image on the cover of the sun setting on New York City to the fact that the report skirts the very issues that are fundamental to reinvention, the thing was designed to be good P.R. that’s ultimately ignored.

Over at Pedestrian Observations, Alon Levy has printed his very thorough examination of just why this report is so underwhelming. You should read his piece; there’s no reason for me to rehash his (or my) arguments. Instead, I want to look at three ways in which the MTA must be reinvented. I don’t the answers as to how — that’s a question above my current pay grade. But these are issues that have to be addressed for NYC to grow, and shockingly, it’s not all about a steady revenue stream.

1. The cost is too damn high. It’s been repeated everywhere for years, but the MTA’s construction costs are too high. For the amount of money they’ve spent on rather piddling subway extension north on 2nd Ave. or west to Hudson Yards, other countries build massive systems. The MTA’s construction costs are up to ten times higher than they should be. Why? Don’t ask the Reinvention Commission; they’re content with urging the MTA simply to “get the right work done faster and cheaper.”

2. Challenge the GCA … and the unions. A committee brought together by a politician isn’t about to go after two of the stronger interest groups in politics, but two of the main drivers behind the MTA’s high costs are contractors and labor. Someone with political capital will have to go after these two groups in order for the MTA to drive down its costs. Cuomo could have done that four years ago, but those were two interests that helped him gain office in the first place.

3. It all takes too long. Ask the MTA how long until we get countdown clocks at B Division stations, and the answer is, as it has been since 2011 or 2012, “three to five years.” Ask the MTA about a MetroCard replacement and the answer is still unclear. Figure out why it’s going to take over eight long years to build 2.5 miles of subway tunnel and three new stations along Second Ave., and you could win some sort of award. It’s been nearly 11 years since the MTA issued its Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Second Ave. Subway. Does that mean what we plan today won’t see the light of day until 2025? Considering that we as a city are barely planning anything, that’s not a good sign.

Start there; reinvent something. Otherwise, nothing will change.

Comments (110)

Earlier this year, in an attempt to save face on his lack of transportation policy, Gov. Andrew Cuomo appointed a who’s who of global transit experts to the so-called MTA Reinvention Commission, and then, nothing happened. The commission met a few times, but the meetings were underwhelming. Then as Election Day came and went, nothing arrived from the panel. It seemed as though Cuomo didn’t want the report to discuss MTA financing ahead of Election Day.

Now, though, the report — or at least an early draft of it — is out, and well, it’s boring. Dana Rubinstein got her hands on it, and you can read the thing at Capital New York (PDF links: Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3). Here’s Rubinstein’s take:

The resulting report suggests that the M.T.A. continue to do some things it’s already doing (make its subways more resilient in cases of flooding, partner with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey to improve access to the region’s airports), and some things it’s not…If the commission’s prescriptions occasionally border on underwhelming—it recommends, for example, that the M.T.A. remove the word “bus” from Select Bus Service to distinguish it from its less-sexy bus counterparts—the report’s description of purpose is strongly worded…

The M.T.A. underpins a New York metropolitan region that “accounts for 60 percent of the population of the state and 80 percent of its tax base, and contributes nearly 10 percent of the nation’s Gross Domestic Product,” the report says.

“Yet despite the value of the system that enables this success, even a cursory glance at peer regions around the world makes it clear that New York is significantly under-investing in its public transportation infrastructure,” it says. “The past is not prologue to the future: if New Yorkers want to continue to live in a world class region they must envision and develop a world class transit system.”

What’s Select Bus Service without the bus? Select Service? That makes no sense to anyone unfamiliar with the transit network, but I digress.

As Rubinstein notes, and as the report clearly details, the commission wants the MTA to continue its capital expansion plans, respond to the challenges of climate change, develop a next-gen fare payment system, build real BRT and, uh, do something about funding. What that something is what the commission punted on, and therein lies the problem.

Reinventing the MTA means answering very hard questions about funding schemes, transportation equity and who’s paying for and using what mode and how. It’s also about pushing politicians to take ownership over the MTA — which is a creation of the state — and it’s about building support for transit from all constituents who use it and their elected representatives. Sometimes that may mean angering smaller, more vocal constituent blocks to deliver something more beneficial to many. That’s just the reality of it.

Here, we have a commission of big names running away from the problem. It’s not clear, and probably never will be, if someone above them torpedoed the politically challenging aspects of transit support, but what we have, unsurprisingly, is a commission tasked with someone grand and delivering an obvious message on a small scale. It’s a reinvention commission that itself needs reinventing.

Comments (81)

Lots of shutdowns coming up. Let’s run them down. First, as part of a critical switch replacement project, the MTA is shutting down some service in parts of Brooklyn on the B, Q and F lines. For two weeks starting at 11 p.m. Friday and running until 5 a.m. Monday, December 1, F trains will be suspended in both directions between Coney Island and Avenue X, and Q trains will be suspended in both directions between Coney Island and Brighton Beach. Free shuttle buses will provide alternate service between Coney Island and all affected stations between Avenue X on the F line, and Brighton Beach on the Brighton lines.

The worse news concerns Sandy-related shutdowns. For 40 weekends next year — non-consecutive at least — the A and C trains will not run through the Cranberry St. Tunnel as the MTA works through repairs. The trains will run via the F between West 4th and Jay St., and we’ll see how the rest of the service plans shape up. It’s not a full shutdown a la the R or G trains, but it’s not a particularly comforting amount of work that looms. The Sandy-related shutdowns will only spread further before they end.

Meanwhile, the weekend’s changes:


From 6:00 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Saturday, November 22 and Sunday, November 23, 2 trains will not run in Brooklyn. Take the 5 instead. 2 service operates between E 180 St and Chambers St, and are rerouted via the 1 between Chambers St and Rector St. 5 trains run between Flatbush Av-Brooklyn College and E 180 St.


From 11:30 p.m. Friday, November 21 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, November 24, 3 trains will not run in Brooklyn. Take the 4 instead. 3 service operates express all weekend between Harlem-148 St and 14 St.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, November 21 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, November 24, 4 service is extended to New Lots Av. 4 service operates all weekend between Woodlawn and New Lots Av, replacing the 3. 4 trains will run local in Brooklyn.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, November 21 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, November 24, 5 service operates between Flatbush Av-Brooklyn College and Wakefield-241 St 2 station all weekend. Free shuttle buses provide alternate service between Dyre Av and E 180 St.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, November 21 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, November 24, 5 trains are suspended in both directions between Eastchester-Dyre Av and E 180 St. Free shuttle buses operate all weekend between Eastchester-Dyre Av and E 180 St, stopping at Baychester Av, Gun Hill Rd, Pelham Pkwy, and Morris Park.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, November 21 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, November 24, Brooklyn Bridge-bound 6 trains run express from Hunters Point Av to 3Av-138 St.


From 11:30 p.m. Friday, November 21 to 4:30 a.m. Monday, November 24, 7 trains are suspended between Times Sq-42 St and Queensboro Plaza. Use EFNQ trains between Manhattan and Queens. Free shuttle buses make all stops between Vernon Blvd-Jackson Av and Queensboro Plaza. The 42 Street S shuttle operates overnight. Q service is extended to Ditmars Blvd from 7:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. on Saturday, November 22, and from 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Sunday, November 23.


From 11:30 p.m. Friday, November 21 to 4:30 a.m. Monday, November 24, 7 trains run express from Queensboro Plaza to 74 St-Broadway.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, November 21 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, November 24, Inwood-207 St bound A trains are rerouted via the F line from Jay St-MetroTech to W 4 St Wash Sq, then run local to 59 St-Columbus Circle.


From 6:30 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Saturday, November 22 and Sunday, November 23, 168 St-bound C trains are rerouted via the F line from Jay St-MetroTech to W 4 St Wash Sq.


From 10:45 p.m. Friday, November 21 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, November 24, Norwood-205 St bound D trains run express from 145 St to Tremont Av.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, November 21 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, November 24, Jamaica Center- Parsons Archer bound E trains run express from Canal St to 34 St-Penn Station.


Beginning 11:00 p.m. Friday, November 21 until 5:00 a.m. Monday, December 1, F trains are suspended in both directions between Coney Island-Stillwell Av and Avenue X. Free shuttle buses operate between Coney Island-Stillwell Av and Avenue X, making station stops at West 8 St-NY Aquarium, and Neptune Av.


Beginning 11:00 p.m. Friday, November 21 until 5:00 a.m. Monday, December 1, Q trains are suspended in both directions between Coney Island-Stillwell Av and Brighton Beach. Free shuttle buses operate between Coney Island-Stillwell Av and Avenue X, making station stops at West 8 St-NY Aquarium, and Neptune Av.


From 7:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Saturday, November 22, and from 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Sunday, November 23, Q service is extended to Astoria-Ditmars Blvd.

42 St Shuttle
From 12:01 a.m. Saturday, November 22, to 6:00 a.m. Monday, November 24, the 42 St S Shuttle operates overnight.

Categories : Service Advisories
Comments (20)
  • Coming Soon: A new courtesy campaign targeting backpacks, seat hogs · For some reason or another, I’ve noticed lately a lot of adults riding the subways at rush hour with backpacks. Glance around a full car, and you’ll see it too: Grown men and women taking up space in the subway by cramming their backpacks into the people around them. They don’t take off their bags and hold them at their feet or between their legs. They just use them as a weapon.

    As things go in the subway, backpacks aren’t the most pressing issue, but they affect the way everyone feels. We begrudge our fellow straphangers who aren’t considerate enough to minimize the space they use on crowded trains. We grow annoyed as every bump, curve, start and stop leads to yet another jab into our shoulders and elbows and backs. We sigh; we shove; we hope a fight doesn’t break out. We grow disgruntled with fellow New Yorkers who don’t recognize that we’re all in this together.

    At the MTA Board Committee meetings earlier this week, Charles Moerdler noted that he had had enough with backpacks and suggested the MTA ban them outright. Of course, this is a foolish line of thinking that would discourage people from riding the subway and could otherwise result in a bunch of unnecessary summonses. But the MTA knows that people are fed with backpacks. So iin early 2015, as part of a rebranding campaign, the MTA is going to target this behavior.

    For the past few years, we’ve been told in countless announcements that “courtesy is contagious,” but that idea came to a screeching halt when a doctor with Ebola rode three subway lines a few weeks ago. Now, in a campaign designed to fight quality-of-life complaints, the MTA will urge riders to take off their backpacks and, more importantly, stop taking up seats by spreading your legs, a campaign with which Jezebel is thrilled. Signs and in-car announcements will carry the word. Whether this will be a success remains to be seen, but this is a message I can get behind. It’s far more tolerable than yet another apology for train traffic ahead of us. · (31)
Page 7 of 499« First...56789...Last »