Home Service Advisories Limited subway service to return to 14 lines tomorrow

Limited subway service to return to 14 lines tomorrow

by Benjamin Kabak

A glimpse at the debris and destruction at the Broad Channel subway station. (Photo via New York City Transit)

With three of the seven East River tunnels cleared of water, the New York City subway system will begin running limited service tomorrow on 14 of the system’s 23 lines, and limited Metro-North and LIRR service will start today at 2 p.m., Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced. There will be no subway service south of either 34th on the West Side or 42nd St. on the East Side in Manhattan as there is no power south of Midtown, and the MTA will supplement subway service with a bus bridge from Brooklyn to Manhattan as crews continue to pump out the East River subway tubes. Full service is expected to be restored slowly, and the Mayor said this afternoon that is unlikely service will be restored under the East River before the weekend.

As of now, the MTA plans to run trains every ten minutes on a limited basis, and the key phrase here seems to be “limited service” as MTA officials are urging straphangers to plan on adding an additional hour to their commute times. Here’s how service will look:

  • 1 trains will operate between 242nd St. and Times Square.
  • 2 trains will operate between 241st St. and Times Square, making express stops south of 96th St.
  • 3 train service is suspended.
  • 4 trains will make all local stops between Woodlawn and Grand Central and between Borough Hall & New Lots Avenue.
  • 5 trains will run express in Brooklyn between Atlantic Avenue and Flatbush Avenue.
  • 6 trains will run local between Pelham Bay Park and Grand Central.
  • 7 train service is suspended.
  • The 42nd St. Shuttle will run between Times Square and Grand Central.
  • A trains will run local between 168th Street and Penn Station and between Jay Street/MetroTech and Lefferts.
  • B and C train service is suspended.
  • D trains will run local between 205th Street and 34th Street and between Atlantic Avenue and Bay Parkway.
  • E train service is suspended.
  • F trains will run local between 179th Street and 34th Street and between Jay Street-MetroTech and Avenue X.
  • G train service is suspended.
  • J trains will run local between Jamaica Center and Hewes Street.
  • L trains will run local between Broadway Junction and Rockaway Parkway.
  • M trains will run local between Myrtle Avenue-Broadway and Metropolitan Avenue.
  • N trains will run local between Ditmars Boulevard and 34th Street.
  • Q train service is suspended.
  • R train runs local between Jay Street-MetroTech and 95th Street.
  • Both the Franklin Avenue and Rockaway Park S shuttles are suspended.

“There will be more [service] on Friday and even more on Saturday,” MTA Chairman Joe Lhota said at a press conference this afternoon. Details for additional service will be released as the situation underground becomes clear.

According to the Governor’s Office, the MTA will also deploy a bus bridge consisting of 330 vehicles from the Barclays Center, MetroTech and Hewes St. to 57th St. and Lexington Ave. via dedicated lanes on 3rd and Lexington Avenues. Earlier today, MTA officials say the Joralemon St. Tunnel (4/5), the Rutgers St. Tunnel (F) and the Clark St. Tunnel (2/3) have been pumped. Crews still need to inspect these tubes for damage before restoring service, and water remains in the Montague St. Tunnel (R), the Cranberry St. Tunnel (A/C), the 14th St. Tunnel (L) and the Steinway Tubes (7).

Metro-North service, meanwhile, will start at 2:06 p.m. and run hourly. A schedule is

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66 comments

Justin Samuels October 31, 2012 - 12:46 pm

This is good news. Bad that Broad Channel is so screwed, but at least some degree of functionality with Bronx, Queens, and uptown people being able to get to Midtown.

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mike d. October 31, 2012 - 1:41 pm

The entire Rockaway line suffer serious damage. North Channel Bridge suffer significant damage, needs fastrack to rebuild the bridge.

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Phantom October 31, 2012 - 12:54 pm

If the trains make it over the bridge to Grand or Canal, that’s a great first step for us Brooklyb types who work downtown

Any chance the J will soon be running to Broad St? That would be good too.

Good job MTA

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Ricky Tinkelman October 31, 2012 - 12:59 pm

The M train is elevated from its second stop in central Queens to the Williamsburg Bridge and is adjacent to its storage yard. Could be a good first start !

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JB October 31, 2012 - 1:08 pm

If your office is downtown, you may want to hold off trying to get it. Apparently power is still down south of 34th as well.

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Phantom October 31, 2012 - 1:38 pm

Yes

My building ( 199 Water, by the Seaport ) had flooding. They are still unsure of the extent of damage to building systems. Even if poweris restored today, the building will not reopen right away.

The other major buildings nearby presumably have the same issue.

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vb October 31, 2012 - 1:55 pm

I biked in to my midtown office today and the first traffic light working on 1st Ave was at 40th St.

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mike d. October 31, 2012 - 1:42 pm

South of 42 Street; no power at all. No service.

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Chris O'Leary October 31, 2012 - 1:42 pm

There’s no power at Broad Street, so as long as there’s an outage downtown, the J has to short-turn at Hewes or Marcy.

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Farro October 31, 2012 - 12:57 pm

Any word on the LIRR?

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Frank B October 31, 2012 - 1:07 pm

Limited Service after 2 pm.

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jim October 31, 2012 - 1:57 pm

Only along Atlantic Ave.

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mike d. October 31, 2012 - 2:03 pm

Jamaica (and) Atlantic Terminal. Its a shuttle train.

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Jon October 31, 2012 - 1:11 pm

Does anyone know what the deal is with the F, N/Q and E/M tunnels that cross Roosevelt Island? Is the implication that all are OK?

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mike d. October 31, 2012 - 1:44 pm

F trains will run 179 to 34 St from the contingency plan.

My source is not confirm on the N, Q, E, M, R train status.

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mike d. October 31, 2012 - 2:01 pm

“Unconfirmed” from my sources:
(A) Wahington Heights-168 St (and) 34 St-Penn Station
(D) Norwood-205 St (and) 34 St-Herald Square
(F) Jamaica-179 St (and) 34 St-Herald Square
(J) Jamaica Center-Parsons Av/Archer Av (and) Marcy Av, Brooklyn.
(M) Middle Village-Met Av (and) Myrtle Av-Broadway or Marcy Av
(N) Astoria-Ditmars Blvd (and) 34 St-Herald Square
(R) Forest Hills-71 Av (and) 34 St-Herald Square
(S) Grand Central (and) Times Square

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Benjamin Kabak October 31, 2012 - 2:03 pm

Some of that is correct and some isn’t. The post has been updated with the full list of service.

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mike d. October 31, 2012 - 2:19 pm

thanks.

JAR October 31, 2012 - 1:14 pm

Marty deleted the tweet. I don’t really understand how they could run trains through from the bridge to 34th if there’s no power.

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Tim October 31, 2012 - 1:16 pm

Any place to find MNR specific details? Wondering when the NH line reopens, so I can finally get home from CT.

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anonymouse October 31, 2012 - 1:26 pm

Keep checking the MTA website, they do seem to be updating it as service starts to actually reopen, though they haven’t been good at saying anything about future plans even when those exist. As of right now, only the Harlem Line is running hourly service starting at 2 PM. I imagine the New Haven will take a little longer since they need to clear the trees out of the wires.

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mike d. October 31, 2012 - 1:46 pm

Harlem line is running hourly schedule today… only ruining up to north White Plains.
http://www.mta.info/status/3

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Larry Littlefield October 31, 2012 - 1:37 pm

The lack of details on the subway system implies they don’t know yet. For one thing, how can they be sure the personnel will show up, and can they get rolling stock to Brooklyn?

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mike d. October 31, 2012 - 1:47 pm

There are rolling stock in Brooklyn that stored in a safe place shelter out the elements from Sandy.

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Bobby P October 31, 2012 - 1:50 pm

Could they extend the length of G trains and/or make them more frequent so that people can get from Brooklyn to the E/M at Court Sq.?

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mike d. October 31, 2012 - 2:02 pm

The tunnel between Brooklyn and Queens is flooded.

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Larry Littlefield October 31, 2012 - 2:29 pm

No one is even reporting that. But it could have made a big difference where I live. They will not be able to run very many A and F trains if they are trying to turn both at Jay Street. If the tunnel wasn’t flooded, they could have run the G on the F line to Queens.

As it is, why can’t they do so to Nassau Street? There appears to be an interlocking there. My wife could at least get to Downtown Brooklyn and then walk.

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Kai B October 31, 2012 - 4:11 pm

They only use that interlocking during rare late-night service changes. My guess is always been that it doesn’t have the capacity to turn trains at any decent daytime frequency.

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Hurricane Sandy - Emergency Measures and Travel Impacts (Oct 2012) - Page 13 - FlyerTalk Forums October 31, 2012 - 2:33 pm

[…] on West Side and below 42nd St. on East Side due to power outage. Trains will run every 10 minutes (summarized by unofficial source): — 1 trains between 242nd St. and Times Square — 2 trains between 241st St. and Times Square, […]

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Ed October 31, 2012 - 2:39 pm

According to the RIOC website, the tram will start running again today after 4 PM.

To get the information off of the RIOC website you have to go to “advisories”, then download and open a PDF file, so more people might get this information from a random blog comment.

Well, I care. I wanted to go see the new FDR memorial -I will be out of town for a long time starting next week- but given its location I have to assume that is closed.

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alek October 31, 2012 - 2:45 pm

Who knows the status might change anytime soon the crews are working non-stop. Impressive job MTA! Hopefully it will be restored soon.

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Abba October 31, 2012 - 2:53 pm

Yes.i think if power is restored by the morning I think everything will be back.

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Nathanael October 31, 2012 - 4:57 pm

You won’t be quite that lucky. Once power is restored to lower Manhattan, I think *most* routes will be back, but there’s still the mess down near Coney Island, the severely flooded stations in Flood Zone A in lower Manhattan, and the Rockaways. Those may take a bit longer.

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Mary Ann October 31, 2012 - 3:03 pm

I am so sick of hearing references to “Hugh L. Carey Tunnel”. Seriously how can we get the rightful name of the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel and Triborough Bridge restored?

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Frank B October 31, 2012 - 3:58 pm

I fought to change the Wikipedia page back to “Triborough” from “Robert F. Kennedy Bridge”, and succeeded; However, to get them officially changed back, you’d need to contact your councilperson and tell them you don’t want more names being changed!

Also, contact the MTA and tell them you didn’t know what the hell the “Hugh L. Carey Tunnel” was, and nearly drowned in the Brooklyn-Battery. That should make them change the names back quickly.

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Kai B October 31, 2012 - 4:14 pm

There needs to be a compromise. How about Carey Battery Tunnel?

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Phantom October 31, 2012 - 4:43 pm

Even Cuomo used the correct name today in a press conference- ” Brooklyn Battery Tunnel ”

Carey was a good guy, and was my congressman then govenor. But this name is stupid and should never be used.

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Rosa October 31, 2012 - 3:04 pm

Is there a way to get to Port Athority? If yes, how please?

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Benjamin Kabak October 31, 2012 - 3:05 pm

From where?

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Tina October 31, 2012 - 3:04 pm

Is the A train running in Queens at all?

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Benjamin Kabak October 31, 2012 - 3:05 pm

Tomorrow, A trains are running only between Jay Street/MetroTech and Lefferts.

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mike d. October 31, 2012 - 3:05 pm

Govorner Cuomo press release: http://www.governor.ny.gov/pre.....TA-Service

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Rosa October 31, 2012 - 3:08 pm

Is there a way to get to the Port Athority from Jamaica Queens?

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John October 31, 2012 - 3:33 pm

That actually seems like the easiest commute you could take. The F is completely fine starting tomorrow between Jamaica-179 St and 34 St-Herald Sq. Just get off at 42 St-Bryant Park and walk two avenues over. I don’t know where you are in Jamaica, but bus service should be fine getting you to the F train terminal.

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MH October 31, 2012 - 3:53 pm

You’ll take the F to 42nd and walk 2 blocks to Port Auth.

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Tina October 31, 2012 - 3:08 pm

Thank you, I guess I can take the A at Rockaway Blvd and hopefully transfer at Jay St. to something getting me to Rock Center. Appreciate all the details here, thank you.

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metsgl October 31, 2012 - 3:26 pm

Nice to see that a map was released: http://www.mta.info/sites/defa.....312012.pdf

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John October 31, 2012 - 3:31 pm

Yeah I was just looking at that too. It’s eerie seeing that huge gaping hole in lower Manhattan due to the power outage. With no 7 train, the Shuttle from Times Square to Grand Central will probably see a lot more use than normal.

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metsgl October 31, 2012 - 3:38 pm

Why they can’t make a map for weekends, I have no idea.

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Spendmore Wastemore October 31, 2012 - 3:36 pm

Where did they park the trains?

They must have been on both sides of the tunnels, and not in low spots that flooded. That takes a lot o space, especially with emptying the huge Coney Island yard and probably the one in East Harlem (that was vacated, yes?) The elevated spots are the obvious choice, but I suspect that’s not what they did.

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Nathanael October 31, 2012 - 4:54 pm

I think some of the elevated spots in Manhattan *were* used; I read one report of this. The elevated spots which are “out in the open” rather than between tall buildings would have rendered the cars prone to wind damage, though…

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Josh October 31, 2012 - 3:53 pm

This is pretty worthless for anyone who works in the Financial District. Given that there’s not much prospect of subways in that area any time soon, why only run shuttle buses to midtown and not also downtown?

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BoerumHillScott October 31, 2012 - 3:56 pm

Normal bus routes are running in Manhattan, so no reduced need for special shuttles.

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Mark October 31, 2012 - 4:03 pm

I think the assumption is the majority of offices are still without power down there. My office is still shutdown.

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Nathanael October 31, 2012 - 4:55 pm

With the careful specification of the routes the buses are taking, are you sure those shuttle buses are non-stop?

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Map: Subway service as of November 1 :: Second Ave. Sagas October 31, 2012 - 4:02 pm

[…] « Limited subway service to return to 14 lines tomorrow Oct […]

Reply
MH October 31, 2012 - 4:12 pm

I wonder if the subway will have “free” fares again tomorrow or is it just too much for the MTA/NYCT’s blood to not have any revenue for a fourth straight day.

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Andrew October 31, 2012 - 4:55 pm

Anyone know if those buses are going to get a dedicated lane on the Brooklyn on Manhattan bridges and along Flatbush? If not, it seems 90% of the journey time will be spent getting from Barclay’s Center to Manhattan!

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Nathanael October 31, 2012 - 5:00 pm

Recently confirmed at the NY Times: there will be dedicated bus lanes for the Brooklyn-Manhattan buses starting Thursday.

http://www.nytimes.com/interac.....=93028a6c7

(Now, why can’t they have those all the time?)

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swordsof1000men November 1, 2012 - 12:14 am

link to the limited service map:

http://forzamilo.wordpress.com.....-eeeeeeee/

Reply
Sandy Update: A free – but limited – commute for the week’s end :: Second Ave. Sagas November 1, 2012 - 1:23 am

[…] a day of crushing congestion and gridlock that state officials called “dangerous,” limited subway service returns at 6 a.m. We even have a temporary map. But despite the quick restoration of some subway […]

Reply
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[…] entire subway system was closed prior to the storm, with only limited service available in the days after as repair crews pumped water out of flooded tunnels and made sure that the transit system was safe […]

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[…] entire subway system was closed prior to the storm, with only limited service available in the days after as repair crews pumped water out of flooded tunnels and made sure that the transit system was safe […]

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