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Due to the Memorial Day holiday, many of this weekend’s service changes extend through Tuesday morning. Give yourself some extra time. You know the drill.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 22 to 5:00 a.m. Tuesday, May 26, South Ferry-bound 1 trains run express from 14 St to Chambers St.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 22 to 5:00 a.m. Tuesday, May 26, Van Cortlandt Park-242 St bound 1 trains run express from Times Sq-42 St to 72 St.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 22 to 6:30 a.m. Monday, May 25, and from 11:45 p.m. Monday, May 25 to 5:00 a.m. Tuesday, May 26, Flatbush Av-Brooklyn College bound 2 trains run express from 14 St to Chambers St.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 22 to 6:30 a.m. Monday, May 25, and from 11:45 p.m. Monday, May 25 to 5:00 a.m. Tuesday, May 26, Wakefield-241 St bound 2 trains run express from Times Sq-42 St to 72 St.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 22 to 6:00 a.m. Saturday, May 23, from 11:45 p.m. Saturday, May 23 to 8:00 a.m. Sunday, May 24, and from 11:45 p.m. Sunday May 24 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 25, Crown Hts-Utica Av bound 4 trains skip 138 St-Grand Concourse.


From 12:01 a.m. Saturday, May 23 to 5:00 a.m. Tuesday, May 26, Woodlawn-bound 4 trains run local from Grand Central-42 St to 125 St.


From 6:00 a.m. Saturday, May 23 to 11:30 p.m. Monday, May 25, 5 trains are suspended in both directions between E 180 St and Bowling Green. Take the 2 and/or 4 instead. 5 shuttle trains operate all weekend between Eastchester-Dyre Av and E 180 St. 6 service is extended to Bowling Green.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 22 to 11:59 p.m. Saturday, May 23, 7 trains are suspended in both directions between Flushing-Main St and Mets-Willets Point. Shuttle buses operate between Flushing-Main St and Mets-Willets Point. Transfer between trains and shuttle buses at Mets-Willets Point.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 22 to 6:30 a.m. Monday, May 25, and from 11:45 p.m. Monday, May 25 to 5:00 a.m. Tuesday, May 26, Inwood-207 St bound A trains run express from 59 St-Columbus Circle to 125 St.


From 6:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Saturday, May 23 to Monday, May 25, 168 St-bound C trains run express from 59 St-Columbus Circle to 125 St.


From 6:30 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Saturday, May 23 to Monday, May 25, Brooklyn-bound C trains run express from 59 St-Columbus Circle to Canal St.


From 3:45 a.m. Saturday, May 15 to 10:00 p.m. Monday, May 25, Coney Island-Stillwell Av bound D trains are rerouted on the N line from 36 St to Coney Island-Stillwell Av.


From 12:30 a.m. Saturday, May 23 to 5:00 a.m. Tuesday, May 26, E trains run local in both directions between Roosevelt Av and Forest Hills-71 Av.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 22, to 5:00 a.m. Tuesday, May 26, Coney Island-Stillwell Av bound F trains are rerouted via the E line from Roosevelt Av to W 4 St-Wash Sq, and then via the A to Jay St-MetroTech. F trains run express from Roosevelt Av to Queens Plaza.


From 12:30 a.m. Saturday, May 23 to 5:00 a.m. Tuesday, May 26, F trains run local in both directions from Roosevelt Av to Forest Hills-71 Av.


From 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Saturday, May 23 and Sunday, May 24, Astoria-Ditmars Blvd bound N trains are rerouted via the R line from Atlantic Av-Barclays Ctr to Canal St.


From 12:30 a.m. Saturday, May 23 to 5:00 a.m. Tuesday, May 26, Coney Island-Stillwell Av bound N trains stop at 45 St and 53 St.


From 11:15 p.m. Friday, May 22 to 5:00 a.m. Tuesday, May 26, Coney Island-Stillwell Av bound Q trains run express from Prospect Park to Kings Hwy.


From 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Saturday, May 23 and Sunday, May 24, 57 St/7 Av-bound Q trains are rerouted via the R line from Atlantic Av-Barclays Ctr to Canal St. 57 St/7 Av-bound Q trains stop at Jay St-MetroTech, Court St, Whitehall St, Rector St, Cortlandt St, and City Hall.


From 6:30 a.m. to 12 Midnight, Saturday, May 23 to Monday, May 25, R service is extended to the Jamaica-179 St F station.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 22 to 6:30 a.m. Monday, May 25, and from 11:45 p.m. Monday, May 25 to 5:00 a.m. Tuesday, May 26, 36 St-bound R trains stop at 53 St and 45 St.

Categories : Service Advisories
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May
21

Video: A Subway Delay Story

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At Monday’s MTA Board committee meetings, the folks who oversee New York City Transit enjoyed a screening of this 8-bit take on the MTA’s service woes. It’s a 110-second summary of how a single delay can echo throughout the system. I’m not sure it really tells us anything new, but it served as an entry into the MTA’s new attempts at improving service on congested lines. Essentially, the MTA is going to use shorter pre-recorded announcements to cut dwell times and employees situated in stations to answer questions. It’s an incremental improvement but without a massive investment in the signal system, that’s among the best the beleaguered agency can do. After my Q train stopped at four red signals between 7th Ave. and De Kalb this morning, I’ll take whatever improvements we can get.

On another note, I know many of you have been asking after me. After my vacation, I came down with a bad cold and have been catching up at work after my trip. I should be able to return to a semi-normal posting schedule over the next week. I’d love to offer up some views on my experiences riding the trains in Berlin and Stockholm. For better or worse, they stand in stark contrast to New York City’s subways. Thanks as always for sticking around.

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I picked a busy week to take vacation. This week’s Amtrak incident is horrific, and it’s led to many more unanswered questions and issues with national rail service. The fallout will reverberate for some time. We’ve learned as well that the city’s subway system is dirtier than the MTA claims — though that’s hardly a surprise to anyone who rides regularly. I’ll have full pieces on this and more starting Monday when I return from vacation.

If you’ve wondered where I’ve been, I’ve spent the past week in Berlin and Stockholm. I’ve posted a series of photos on both my Instagram account and Facebook page. The Stockholm Tunnelbana is breathtaking, but Berlin’s Ghost Stations are just an incredible piece of fascinating history.

Those running the Brooklyn Half tomorrow don’t have subway advisories to combat early in the morning, but the weather doesn’t sound too cooperative. Stay dry; run hard. I’ll see you all on Monday.

(As an administrative note, many of you noted mistakes in last week’s service advisory post. These are sent to me via NYC Transit, and I just copy and paste them for this post. If there are errors, take it up with Transit, and check signs in your local subway station before planning weekend journeys.)


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 15 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 18, Manhattan-bound 2 trains run express from Franklin Av to Atlantic Av-Barclays Ctr.


From 6:30 a.m. to 12 Midnight Saturday, May 16 and Sunday, May 17, Manhattan-bound 3 trains run express from Franklin Av to Atlantic Av-Barclays Ctr.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 15 to 7:30 a.m. Sunday, May 17, and from 11:45 p.m. Sunday, May 17 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 18, Manhattan-bound 4 trains run express from Franklin Av to Atlantic Av-Barclays Ctr.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 15 to 6:00 a.m. Saturday, May 16, from 11:45 p.m. Saturday, May 16 to 8:00 a.m. Sunday, May 17, and from 11:45 p.m. Sunday May 17 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 18, Woodlawn-bound 4 trains skip 138 St-Grand Concourse.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 15 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 18, 5 trains are suspended in both directions between Eastchester-Dyre Av and E 180 St. Free shuttle buses operate all weekend between Eastchester-Dyre Av and E 180 St, stopping at Baychester Av, Gun Hill Rd, Pelham Pkwy, and Morris Park. Transfer between trains and shuttle buses at E 180 St.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 15, to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 18, Pelham Bay Park-bound 6 trains run express from 3 Av-138 St to Hunts Point Av.

  • To Brook Av, Cypress Av, E 143 St, E 149 St, and Longwood Av, take the 6 to Hunts Point Av and transfer to a Brooklyn Bridge-City Hall bound 6.
  • From these stations, take a 6 to 3 Av-138 St and transfer to a Pelham Bay Park-bound 6.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 15 to 6:30 a.m. Sunday, May 17, and from 11:45 p.m. Sunday, May 17 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 18, Brooklyn-bound A trains run express from 125 St to Canal St.


From 6:30 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Saturday, May 16 and Sunday, May 17, Brooklyn-bound C trains run express from 125 St to Canal St.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 15 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 18, Coney Island-Stillwell Av bound D trains are rerouted on the N line from 36 St to Coney Island-Stillwell Av.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 15 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 18, World Trade Center-bound E trains run express from 34 St-Penn Station to Canal St.


From 12:15 a.m. to 6:30 a.m. Saturday and Sunday, May 16 and May 17, and from 12:15 a.m. to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 18, Jamaica Center-Parsons/Archer bound E trains run express from Queens Plaza to Roosevelt Av.


From 12:30 a.m. Saturday, May 16 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 18, Jamaica Center- Parsons/Archer bound E trains run local from Roosevelt Av to Forest Hills-71 Av, and World Trade Center-bound E trains run local from Forest Hills-71 Av to Queens Plaza.


From 12:30 a.m. Saturday, May 16 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 18, Jamaica-179 St bound F trains run local from Roosevelt Av to Forest Hills-71 Av. Coney Island-Stillwell Av bound F trains run local from Forest Hills-71 Av to 21 St-Queensbridge.


From 5:45 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Saturday, May 16 and Sunday, May 17, Chambers St-bound J trains run express from Broadway Junction to Myrtle Av.


From 11:30 p.m. Friday, May 15 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 18, L trains are suspended in both directions between 8 Av and Lorimer St. Use AJM, M14, and free shuttle buses.

  • L service operates between Lorimer St and Rockaway Pkwy.
  • M service is extended to the 57 St F station, days and evenings.
  • Free shuttle buses operate between Lorimer St and the Broadway G station, stopping at Bedford Av, Marcy Av JM, and Hewes St J/M.
  • Transfer between free shuttle buses and JM trains at Marcy Av or Hewes St.
  • A free MetroCard transfer is available from the Broadway G to the Lorimer St JM station.
  • Consider using the A or J to/from Manhattan via transfer at Broadway Junction or the M via transfer at Myrtle-Wyckoff Avs.
  • M14A buses provide alternate service along 14 St between 8 Av and 1 Av, and connect with the JM at Delancey-Essex Sts station.


From 6:30 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. Saturday, May 16, and 8:30 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Sunday, May 17, M service is extended to the 57 St F line station.


From 5:45 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Sunday, May 17, Manhattan-bound Q trains run express from Kings Hwy to Prospect Park.


From 6:30 a.m. to 12 Midnight, Saturday, May 16 and Sunday, May 17, Forest Hills-71 Av bound R trains run express from Queens Plaza to Roosevelt Av.

Rockaway Park Shuttle
From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 15 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 18, the Rockaway Park Shuttle is suspended. Shuttle buses provide alternate service between Rockaway Park and the Beach 67 St A station, stopping at Beach 105 St, Beach 98 St, and Beach 90 St. Transfer between shuttle buses and A trains at Beach 67 St.

Categories : Service Advisories
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I apparently picked a good weekend to head out of the country as nearly every subway line has an alert due to some weekend work, and I can’t remember a weekend quite as busy as this one. Anyway, as you may have figured, I’m on vacation for the next week. I’ll try to check in here as I have time, but I’ll likely not be posting much. You can follow me on Instagram for scenes from my travels. I’ve already taken multiple U-Bahn trips in Berlin and will be riding Stockholm’s Tunnelbana next week. Meanwhile, here are those numerous service advisories.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 8 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 11, South Ferry-bound 1 trains run express from 96 St to Times Sq-42 St.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 8 to 6:30 a.m. Sunday, May 10, and from 11:45 p.m. Sunday, May 10 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 11, Brooklyn-bound 2 trains run express from 96 St to Times Sq-42 St.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 8 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 11, 3 trains operate to/from New Lots Av all weekend, replacing the 4 in Brooklyn. 3 trains run express in Manhattan.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 8 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 11, 4 trains are suspended in both directions between Bowling Green and New Lots Av. 23 trains provide alternate service. Transfer between 4 and 23 trains at Fulton St. Downtown 4 trains run local from 125 St to Grand Central-42 St.


From 6:00 to 11:00 p.m. Saturday, May 9 and from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Sunday, May 10, Flatbush Av-Brooklyn College bound 5 trains run local from 125 St to Grand Central-42 St.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 8, to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 11, Pelham Bay Park-bound 6 trains run express from 3 Av-138 St to Hunts Point Av.

  • To Brook Av, Cypress Av, E 143 St, E 149 St, and Longwood Av, take the 6 to Hunts Point Av and transfer to a Brooklyn Bridge-City Hall bound 6.
  • From these stations, take a 6 to 3 Av-138 St and transfer to a Pelham Bay Park-bound 6.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 8 to 6:30 a.m. Sunday, May 10, and from 11:45 p.m. Sunday, May 10 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 11, Inwood-207 St bound A trains skip Spring St, 23 St, and 50 St. Trains run every 15 minutes.


From 6:30 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Saturday, May 9 and Sunday, May 10, 168 St-bound C trains skip Spring St, 23 St, and 50 St. Trains run every 15 minutes.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 8 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 11, Coney Island-Stillwell Av bound D trains are rerouted on the N line from 36 St to Coney Island-Stillwell Av.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 8 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 11, 168 St Queens-bound E trains skip Spring St, 23 St. Trains run every 15 minutes.


From 12:15 a.m. to 6:30 a.m. Saturday and Sunday, May 9 and May 10, and from 12:15 a.m. to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 11, Jamaica Center-Parsons/Archer bound E trains run express from Queens Plaza to Roosevelt Av.


From 12:30 a.m. Saturday, May 9 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 11, Jamaica Center- Parsons/Archer bound E trains run local from Roosevelt Av to Forest Hills-71 Av, and World Trade Center-bound E trains run local from Forest Hills-71 Av to Queens Plaza.


From 9:45 p.m. Friday, May 8, to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 11, Jamaica-179 St bound F trains are rerouted via the M line from 47-50 Sts/Rock Ctr to Roosevelt Av.


From 12:30 a.m. Saturday, May 9 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 11, Jamaica-179 St bound F trains run local from Roosevelt Av to Forest Hills-71 Av. Coney Island-Stillwell Av bound F trains run local from Forest Hills-71 Av to 21 St-Queensbridge.


From 5:45 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Saturday, May 9 and Sunday, May 10, Chambers St-bound J trains run express from Broadway Junction to Myrtle Av.


From 11:30 p.m. Friday, May 8 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 11, L trains are suspended in both directions between 8 Av and Lorimer St. Use AJM, M14, and free shuttle buses.

  • L service operates between Lorimer St and Rockaway Pkwy.
  • M service is extended to the 57 St F station, days and evenings.
  • Free shuttle buses operate between Lorimer St and the Broadway G station, stopping at Bedford Av, Marcy Av JM, and Hewes St J/M.
  • A free MetroCard transfer is available from the Broadway G to the Lorimer St J/M station.
  • Transfer between free shuttle buses and JM trains at Marcy Av or Hewes St.
  • Consider using the A or J to/from Manhattan via transfer at Broadway Junction or the M via transfer at Myrtle-Wyckoff Avs.
  • M14A buses provide alternate service along 14 St between 8 Av and 1 Av, and connect with the J/M at Delancey-Essex Sts station.


From 6:30 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. Saturday, May 9, and 8:30 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Sunday, May 10, M service is extended to the 57 St F line station.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 8 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 11, Coney Island-Stillwell Av bound N trains skip 49 St.


From 12:01 a.m. Saturday, May 9 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 11, Astoria-Ditmars Blvd bound N trains run local from 59 St to 36 St in Brooklyn.


From 10:45 a.m. to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 11, Manhattan-bound Q trains run express from Kings Hwy to Prospect Park.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 8 to 6:30 a.m. Sunday, May 10, and from 11:45 p.m. Sunday, May 10 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 11, Coney Island-Stillwell Av bound Q trains skip 49 St.


From 6:30 a.m. to 12 Midnight, Saturday, May 9 and Sunday, May 10, Forest Hills-71 Av bound R trains run express from Queens Plaza to Roosevelt Av.


From 6:30 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Saturday, May 9 and Sunday, May 10, Brooklyn-bound R trains skip 49 St.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 8 to 6:30 a.m. Sunday, May 10, and from 11:45 p.m. Sunday, May 10 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 11, 36 St-bound R shuttle trains stop at 53 St and 45 St.

Rockaway Park Shuttle
From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 8 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 11, the Rockaway Park Shuttle is suspended. Shuttle buses provide alternate service between Rockaway Park and the Beach 67 St A station, stopping at Beach 105 St, Beach 98 St, and Beach 90 St. Transfer between shuttle buses and A trains at Beach 67 St.

Categories : Service Advisories
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The Daily News was not impressed with the Mayor's complaints over subway delays.

The Daily News was not impressed with the Mayor’s complaints over subway delays.

When Bill de Blasio ran for mayor on a populist platform, he didn’t spend much time talking about transit. On one hand, that was by design. As the city has long ago ceded real control over MTA funding to the state, local politicians don’t feel the need to campaign on or do much to support the subway system. On the other hand, de Blasio wasn’t a subway guy. As a long-serving elected official, he drove everywhere. He didn’t — and still doesn’t — understand what the subways mean to the everyday lives of New Yorkers.

This political problem reared its head in early April when, with good intentions, de Blasio drove from the Upper East Side to Brooklyn in order to take a 20-minute subway ride designed to drum up support for federal transit funding. Yet, the Mayor took a lot of flak for his stunt because it was so blatantly just that. Instead of offering up more city money first and putting his money where his mouth was, de Blasio used a subway ride to earn some political points.

This week, the Mayor’s transit problem reared its head again in two distinct, but perhaps related, stories. First, on the day de Blasio’s team unveiled a budget that included a whopping $25 million increase in MTA capital funding — all the way up to $125 million — MTA CEO and Chairman Tom Prendergast made the case for even more funding. Relying on a recent Independent Budget Office study that garnered a lot of attention, Prendergast asked for at least $300 million annually and urged the city to contribute at least $1 billion to the next phase of the Second Ave. Subway.

Noting that “the role of the city’s mass transit system is historical and obvious,” Prendergast said today is “the right time for the City to acknowledge the need for significantly increased investment” in transit. “We believe the City must share in the cost of projects needed to ease current ridership growth and the system enhancements and expansion needed to address further growth,” the MTA chief wrote. “An example of such an investment — similar to the role played by the city in the extension of the 7 line to the west side — is the construction of the Second Avenue Subway line. We suggest the appropriate level of City investment in Second Avenue is a minimum of $1.0 billion over the five-year capital plan.”

In a subsequent exchange on Twitter between Adam Lisberg, the top MTA spokesman, and Amy Spitalnick, a top mayoral aide, Spitalnick accused the MTA of moving the goalposts. “We decided to fully meet MTA’s request. Our budget went to print. Then MTA moves the goal posts,” she said, defending the low amount. Of course, advocacy groups have called upon the city to fund at the $300 million level for months, but that again speaks to transit as a priority.

With this ongoing battle over funding as the backdrop, the Mayor on Monday “accidentally” sent an email to a Times reporter bemoaning a long subway wait. He supposedly left just 15 minutes to wait for an A or C train, travel from Canal St. to 34th St. and get somewhere on time. The Mayor, known for his tardiness, supposedly found himself waiting for over 20 minutes before dashing off the email in a huff. For what it’s worth, the mayor is always late, and there’s no record of a delay in the MTA’s text alert longs. That’s not a definitive listing of all subway problems, but New Yorkers have a long history of fudging MTA delays as excuses for tardiness. Just ask anyone who’s arrived at work 20 minutes late for an important meeting.

The Mayor’s optics problem is that in his email he noted that “we need a better system” regarding subway delay notifications and that it is “a fixable problem.” Of course it is, and all it requires is some political and economic support, but the mayor’s tardiness again pushed a real issue — transit funding — off the front pages. Meanwhile, local pols are trying to look everywhere but here for support, and the MTA may be a pawn in the ongoing de Blasio-Cuomo feud. But the truth is that populism and capitalism and economic growth in New York — from affordable housing to a vibrant and competitive job market — relies on the subway. The sooner our politicians digest this reality, the sooner we can move beyond petty tiffs and discuss real funding solutions.

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I’m a bit swamped this week as I’m heading out for vacation on Thursday afternoon. I’ll do my best to expand on some of these topics as the week goes on, but for now, I’d like to offer up a short post on a topic I’ve covered in the past: MTA advertising.

As part of a back and forth with Pamela Geller’s group, the MTA has struggled to craft a constitutionally-acceptable ad policy that doesn’t infringe on First Amendment protections. The agency tried to amend its policy in late 2012 but has been engaged in protracted legal wrangling over the revised versions. Recently, a federal judge found that the MTA had to run anti-Muslim ads under its policy, and in response, the MTA has barred all political advertising from appearing in ads. (Check out the revised policy in this pdf).

On its surface, this strikes me as an impermissible content-based restriction on free speech, but recent Sixth Circuit jurisprudence may say otherwise. A case out of Southern Michigan found that SMART could bar all political speech as it did not consider buses to be public forums. The Second Circuit hasn’t been as forgiving, and I wouldn’t be surprised to see this matter head to the Supreme Court. (WNYC delves into the legal theorizing over the constitutionality of the MTA’s moves.)

Geller has already said she plans to sue the agency over its latest revisions, and so far, the MTA has yet to win a case against her group. As a lawyer, I’ve always been intrigued by this give-and-take, and I’ll keep an eye out on this story as it unfolds in the coming months.

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So here’s a funny one for you: The MTA sent out a press release on Thursday that, on Monday morning, they’re closing one platform on the 89th busiest subway station in the city for four months. Due to rehab work at 103rd St., the southbound platform at the 6 train’s stop in East Harlem will be out of service until September. The work includes repairs to the draining system, platform edges, floor tiles, ceilings, and walls. You would think though that a project of this scope would include a little bit more advanced notice.

During this closure, the northbound platform will remain in service, and the MTA is urging its customers to take the M101, M102 or M103 buses to 96th St. for the subway. My guess is that the northbound platform is next, but Transit hasn’t said yet. Meanwhile, 14 subway lines are undergoing changes due to weekend work. Here they are:


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 1 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 4, South Ferry bound 1 trains run express from 145 St to 96 St.


From 6:30 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Saturday, May 2 and Sunday, May 3, 3 trains are suspended in both directions between Franklin Av and New Lots Av.

  • Free shuttle buses operate all weekend between Crown Hts-Utica Av and New Lots Av, making all station stops.
  • Transfer between 23 and 4 trains at Franklin Av.
  • Transfer between 4 trains and free shuttle buses at Crown Hts-Utica Av.
  • 4 trains run local between Franklin Av and Crown Hts-Utica Av all weekend.


From 11:30 p.m. Friday, May 1 to 7:30 a.m. Sunday, May 3, and from 11:30 p.m. Sunday, May 3 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 4, 4 trains are suspended in both directions between Crown Hts-Utica Av and New Lots Av. Free shuttle buses operate all weekend between Crown Hts-Utica Av and New Lots Av, making all station stops.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 1 to 6:30 a.m. Sunday, May 3, and from 11:45 p.m. Sunday, May 3 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 4, Crown Hts-Utica Av bound 4 trains run express from 125 St to Grand Central-42 St. Woodlawn-bound 4 trains run express from Grand Central-42 St to 14 St-Union Sq.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 1 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 4, 5 trains are suspended in both directions between Eastchester-Dyre Av and E 180 St.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 1, to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 4, Brooklyn Bridge-City Hall bound 6 trains run express from 125 St to Grand Central-42 St.


From 11:45 p.m. Friday, May 1, to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 4, Pelham Bay Park-bound 6 trains run express from 14 St-Union Sq to Grand Central-42 St.


From 12:01 a.m. Saturday, May 2, to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 4, Brooklyn-bound A trains run local from 168 St to Canal St. Inwood-207 St bound A trains run local from Canal St to 59 St-Columbus Circle.


From 6:30 a.m. to 12 Midnight Saturday, May 2 and Sunday, May 3, C trains run every 15 minutes.


From 3:45 a.m. Saturday, May 2 to 10:00 p.m. Sunday, May 3, Norwood-205 St bound D trains are rerouted on the N line from Coney Island-Stillwell Av to 36 St.


From 12:01 a.m. Saturday, May 2, to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 4, Brooklyn-bound D trains run local from 145 St to 59 St-Columbus Circle.


From 12:15 a.m. to 6:30 a.m. Saturday and Sunday, May 2 and May 3, and from 12:15 a.m. to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 4, Jamaica Center-Parsons/Archer bound E trains run express from Queens Plaza to Roosevelt Av.


From 12:30 a.m. Saturday, May 2 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 4, Jamaica Center- Parsons/Archer bound E trains run local from Roosevelt Av to Forest Hills-71 Av, and World Trade Center-bound E trains run local from Forest Hills-71 Av to Queens Plaza.


From 9:45 p.m. Friday, May 1, to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 4, Jamaica-179 St bound F trains are rerouted via the M line from 47-50 Sts/Rock Ctr to Roosevelt Av.


From 12:30 a.m. Saturday, May 2 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 4, Jamaica-179 St bound F trains run local from Roosevelt Av to Forest Hills-71 Av. Coney Island-Stillwell Av bound F trains run local from Forest Hills-71 Av to 21 St-Queensbridge.


From 11:30 p.m. Friday, May 1 to 5:00 a.m. Monday, May 4, L trains are suspended in both directions between 8 Av and Lorimer St. Use AJM, M14, and free shuttle buses.

  • A free MetroCard transfer is available from the Broadway G to the Lorimer St J/M station.
  • L service operates between Lorimer St and Rockaway Pkwy.
  • M service is extended to the 57 St F station, days and evenings.
  • Free shuttle buses operate between Lorimer St and the Broadway G station, stopping at Bedford Av, Marcy Av J/M, and Hewes St J/M.
  • Transfer between free shuttle buses and J/M trains at Marcy Av or Hewes St.
  • Consider using the A or J to/from Manhattan via transfer at Broadway Junction or the M via transfer at Myrtle-Wyckoff Avs.
  • M14A buses provide alternate service along 14 St between 8 Av and 1 Av, and connect with the J/M at Delancey-Essex Sts station.


From 6:30 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. Saturday, May 2, and 8:30 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Sunday, May 3, M service is extended to the 57 St F line station.


From 5:45 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Saturday, May 2 and Sunday, May 3, Manhattan-bound Q trains run express from Kings Hwy to Prospect Park.


From 6:30 a.m. to 12 Midnight, Saturday, May 2 and Sunday, May 3, Forest Hills-71 Av bound R trains run express from Queens Plaza to Forest Hills-71 Av.

Categories : Service Advisories
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The wacky font at 63rd St. and Lexington is the first glimpse of the tiling for the Second Ave. Subway. (Via MTA)

The wacky font at 63rd St. and Lexington is the first glimpse of the tiling for the Second Ave. Subway. (Via MTA)

As far as bargaining chips the MTA can use for leverage in discussions over capital funding, the MTA’s options are few and far between. Short of kidnapping a bunch of customers and hiding them in the station shell at South 4th Street, MTA officials can only make noises about potential options. We heard about steep fare hikes yesterday, but those aren’t the only trump cards the agency can play. How about big-ticket capital projects?

During the same press conference at which he promised not to raise fares to delivery capital funding to the cash-strained MTA, agency head Tom Prendergast spoke about what may need to go in the capital plan if funding doesn’t materialize, and of course, the namesake of my site came up. As part of the five-year spending plan, the MTA has requested $1.5 billion for the Second Ave. Subway. This line-item isn’t without controversy as the MTA hasn’t put a dollar figure on Phase 2 in over decade and wants a large sum for initial construction set to begin in the last year of the proposed five-year plan.

Still, the MTA knows the Second Ave. Subway won’t cost less than $1.5 billion, and the agency needs this money to keep momentum going. When Phase 1 of the Second Ave. Subway opens, the rest of the East Side will clamor for more segments of this line. It’s going to be that much of a game-changer for people that this phased approach is likely to be viewed as a mistake (if it already isn’t).

But as is the MTA’s wont with in-demand projects, the Second Ave. Subway makes for a potential liability and lever. In speaking on the impact of no funding solution earlier this week, Tom Prendergast said, as Capital New York reported, that future phases of the project could be “put on hold.” Isn’t that exactly what Sheldon Silver wanted when he forced the MTA to break one subway line into quarters?

The MTA can’t really afford not to build out more of the Second Ave. Subway. After all, phase two northward to Harlem and 125th St. is the part that will truly alleviate capacity constraints along the Lexington Ave. line. But threatening the future of the Second Ave. Subway is indeed something the MTA can do. Much like Prendergast or his underlings can discuss fare hikes, so too can the MTA boss talk about putting capital projects on hold. The more he discusses this in the context of Albany, the clearer it becomes that someone is responsible for holding up discussions surrounding badly-needed subway extension plans. I don’t love using the Second Ave. Subway as a bargaining chit, but if it forces legislators to the table as the days tick by, that’s better than the alternative.

Meanwhile, to show progress and perhaps to force a reckoning over this capital funding issue, the MTA released a series of photos from inside the Second Ave. Subway construction area. The agency maintains that the new stations will open for revenue service by the end of December of 2016. That gives the agency a full 20 months from today to realize this goal. The clock is ticking, and the delays at 34th St. and 11th Ave. along the 7 line loom large. Click through for some photos and check out the full set in this PDF presentation. Read More→

For all of its troubles, politically and economically, the MTA always has a trump card in its back pocket. If nothing happens with regards to the multi-billion-dollar hole in its capital plan, the agency can always look to fare revenue for a potential source of income. The agency’s leaders know they have a captive audience of New Yorkers who have to come to rely on the subway system now more than ever; they know they can jack up tolls; and they know it gets the attention of those in Albany when the dreaded phrase “fare hikes” comes up in the public discourse.

Earlier this week as yet more time passed with nothing happening with regards to the MTA’s 2015-2019 capital plan, agency officials started talking about fare hikes and boy did it start something in the halls of power. During committee meetings on Monday, MTA CEO Bob Foran confirmed what anyone in the know already knows: The MTA could close its capital funding gap by issuing more debt which would incur higher operating costs in the form of debt service which would be covered by … fare hikes.

“If we do not receive adequate funding to carry us through the next two years, we don’t have sufficient funds to keep the program going. At some point, the board may take action and the action that they really only can turn to would be one that addresses fares and tolls,” Foran said.

He explained that fare hikes to cover the gap could top 15% — a far cry from the current rate of around four percent every two years the MTA has implemented. Meanwhile, Foran wasn’t the only one crying foul. Jeffrey Kay noted similar concerns. “If they don’t do anything in the next two months, we have a freight train coming at us,” he said. “This is a real problem, and it’s not just going to impact the MTA. It’s going to impact the riders, it’s going to impact the workforce, it’s going to impact the construction unions, and it’s going to impact jobs…This is a real serious issue, and I don’t know what we can do in order to tell our partners that this is real.”

A day after the meetings — clearly on orders from Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s office — MTA CEO and Chairman Tom Prendergast released a statement backtracking on his colleagues’ assertions. ““Yesterday’s mention of a potential 15 percent fare and toll increase,” Prendergast said on Tuesday, “was a hypothetical answer to a hypothetical question. No one has proposed we pay for our capital needs on the backs of our riders, and no one is considering it.”

He reiterated those sentiments on Wednesday following the MTA’s full board meeting. “We have never, ever closed the capital program on the backs of the fare payers. That’s unconscionable. That’s not our desire. That’s not what we’re going to do,” he promised, again sounding as though the governor’s office had turned the screws on him.

Prendergast doth protest too much as the truth is that few options are even on the table. James Brennan’s proposal hasn’t moved much in the two weeks since it was introduced, and more troubling is recent borough-based opposition to the Move New York plan. A group of Queens Democrats, including the usually transit-friendly Assembly rep Phillip Goldfeder and Borough President Melinda Katz, issued a statement in opposition to Move New York because they claim it is “unfair” to Queens and “lacks any promise of returns.” How they drew this conclusion is beyond me, but their statement is far more damaging to transit in New York City than these politicians realize.

Goldfeder tried to defend his position to me on Twitter. He claims to be concerned that Move New York doesn’t “address transit starved communities,” but without the dedicated revenue, the MTA doesn’t have the money to begin to implement improvements. It’s not even a Catch-22; it’s just common sense — something I usually expect from transit allies such as Goldfeder and Katz.

Overall, without Queens’ Democrats, Cuomo isn’t likely to embrace Move New York, and without Cuomo, Move New York — along the $1 billion that come with it — is dead in the water. Thus, we circle back to the MTA’s fare hikes. They’re a threat and a political cudgel the MTA can use to get attention, but they also shouldn’t be dismissed. Fare hikes are, after all, the only way the MTA can guarantee revenue for itself, and if New Yorkers don’t like the idea of a 15 percent hike, I know a bunch of politicians in Queens who deserve to bear the brunt of any complaints.

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Back in the mid-1990s, when the Port Authority opened the Newark AirTrain, it was widely viewed as a mess of a project. Trying to buy a customized product from a less-successful company, the Port Authority spent $354 million in mid-1990s dollars on the slow and hulking system with tiny cars and generally not enough capacity they have today. What they didn’t say at the time was that the design life of the system was 25 years, and well, wouldn’t you know, but time flies. That 25 years is almost up, and without a planning process that begins now, the PA will shoot past that deadline with no replacement in sight.

So you would think that the Port Authority would take this opportunity to right a wrong. Perhaps they could double down on Gov. Christie’s pet project — perhaps spurred on by corrupt dealings with United Airlines — and extend the PATH not just to the EWR Amtrak/New Jersey Transit stop but all the way to the airport terminals. Perhaps they’ll learn from the 1990s and not sink untold millions into a project that winds up over budget and years delayed. Or perhaps they already want to spend $70 million on design and technical consultants alone.

In materials released in advance of Thursday’s Port Authority board meeting, the agency unveiled its intentions to do just that. The documents contain a planning authorization for the AirTrain replacement, and the initial expenditures are significant. The PA plans to spend $30 million on technical consultants and $40 million on planning consultants. To cover the latter costs, the Port Authority is going to request permission from the FAA to use Passenger Facility Charges. And what, you may wonder, will they get for their $70 million? Straight from the horse’s mouth:

Currently, AirTrain experiences crowding issues, because demand exceeds capacity during peak periods and weather-induced delays. Although substantial investment has been made to maintain current operations, such investment has not extended the 25-year design life of the system, nor has it expanded capacity.

The proposed planning work would support alternative analysis, conceptual layouts, environmental review, cost estimates, scheduling, financing needs and funding alternatives for the replacement of AirTrain and coordination with other short-term and long-term development at EWR, including the replacement of Terminal A. Professional services would be required to support the planning effort via task orders, through the selection of a contractor(s) to replace the system, at an estimated amount of $30 million. The consultant to support the planning effort for the replacement of the AirTrain system would be retained via a publicly advertised Request for Proposals process, with award to the highest-rated proposer. The consultant contract also would include additional tasks to support the oversight and implementation of the replacement of the AirTrain system through project completion, which would be at an additional cost and subject to future authorization.

Despite a 2011 report that indicated the AirTrain represented a challenge for Newark Airport’s crowds, the Port Authority didn’t include replacement requests in its current $27-billion, 10-year capital plan. Rather, they’re going to spend at least $1-$1.5 billion on a PATH extension and, I’d imagine, at least another half a billion on the AirTrain replacement. At a time when the region is in bad need of a trans-Hudson tunnel and when New York’s Gov. Cuomo wants to spend another billion dollars on a LaGuardia AirTrain, it may be time to step back and consider exactly what we’re getting for our dollars. Does anyone really trust the Port Authority to invest wisely — besides, that is, the consultants who see dollar signs on the horizon?

Categories : PANYNJ
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